ROTA blog

How elite sportswomen have helped put mental health on the agenda

Following the cancellation of most major events last summer due to the Covid-19 pandemic, it was great to see our stars reunited with their fans. However, as well as the titles and accolades, some sporting events brought the topic of mental health to the news agenda, demonstrating that we must continue to educate people on this problem.

Two Decades after the 911 attacks, British Muslims still feel the impact

Two Decades after the 911 attacks, British Muslims still feel the impact writes Yusef Alam.

 

THIS WEEK marks the 20th anniversary of the horrific 9/11 terror attacks on the USA in which over 2,900 people lost their lives. The event stunned the world and the impact is still being felt today.

14 dead, nothing said - The New Cross Massacre 40 years on

If black lives didn’t seem to matter in 2020, they mattered even less four decades earlier.

Forty years ago this weekend (Sunday 18 January 1981), a joyous 16th birthday party in a South London home, turned into a tragedy after 13 black youngsters were killed when the house became a deadly inferno.

Governmental Gaslighting from the Equalities Minister

Minister for Women and Equalities Liz Truss set out the Johnson administration’s overhaul the Government’s equalities work this week, but it turned out to be nothing more than gaslighting on a governmental scale.

Truss declared the fight for equality should be led by ‘facts, not fashion’ and claimed notions of structural racism, protected characteristics and intersectionality were simply the flavour of the month and had all been proven worthless.

Does Black History Month still have a purpose?

Arthur Wharton, the first Black man to play professional football in Britain

Though first observed in the United States in the 1970s, Black History Month was first celebrated in the UK in October 1987.

Taking place mainly in educational and local council institutions, the idea behind it was to give some exposure to Black historical figures who’s achievements had been previously overlooked by the existing school curriculum, that preferred instead to focus their attention on the achievements of the white English men.

Covid-19: is there an opportunity for a new approach to informal exclusions?

 

The Department for Education has produced a guidance document for schools when they re-open in September after the Covid-19 closures.  ROTA has some thoughts.  

The period of lockdown has proved particularly challenging for some pupils, particularly those from disadvantaged communities. Refugees, asylum seekers, children from some BAME communities and from Gipsy, Roma and Traveller families have had difficulty accessing support and education resources.  

New evidence on informal exclusions

Since 2012 ROTA has been gathering evidence on informal school exclusions - and its various guises such ‘off rolling’ and ‘home schooling’ -  to the detriment of pupils and their families who have experienced this. We also have evidence that young BAME pupils may be disproportionately affected.  It comes as no surprise to ROTA that not only is this practice continuing in 2018 but may be increasing. 

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